Introduce baby male older female

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Elizarat
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Introduce baby male older female

Post by Elizarat » Thu Jul 06, 2017 11:05 pm

I have just had one of my girls pass away this morning and I've heard that it's best to get another cagemate(s). This has been my second set of rats both females. The introduction of my first and second set didnt go so well but i have hope. I would like to get males next as I've had a bad time with both sets of females getting mammary tumors. I know males can get tumors as well but im hoping a smaller chance than females. My question is can i get male rat to keep my lone female happy she just turned 2 years. The girl that just passed was her biological sister not sure if that makes a difference so never spent more than 24hr apart[/b]

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Caza66
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Re: Introduce baby male older female

Post by Caza66 » Fri Jul 07, 2017 7:44 am

I wouldn't introduce intact males to females. I'm not sure if there is an age when females can't get pregnant, but I wouldn't try it. Unless your female has been spayed. You could keep an eye out for a spayed female to join your girl, and then when she passes away you could introduce the spayed female to boys. Or you could look out for 2 neutered boys to join your girl.

It's an awkward situation to be in and I hope you find the right solution.
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cyber ratty
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Re: Introduce baby male older female

Post by cyber ratty » Fri Jul 07, 2017 8:14 am

There isn't an age at which a doe becomes infertile, so do not introduce any intact males to her.

I agree that a neutered male or two is the best option - they aren't very common, but some rescues routinely neuter lone bucks, or would be willing to arrange it in order to find them a home. You'll need to wait at least two weeks after the neutering before starting the introduction though.

Finding a spayed doe would be harder, but I'd suggest contacting as many rescues as possible, and also, asking on the facebook group Rat Rescue Network UK.

Elizarat
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Re: Introduce baby male older female

Post by Elizarat » Fri Jul 07, 2017 10:34 am

Thanks i wasnt sure. Does anyone know if males are less like to develop tumors?

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[cub]
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Re: Introduce baby male older female

Post by [cub] » Fri Jul 07, 2017 10:44 am

Male rats are certainly less likely to develop mammary and pituitary tumours, which are the most common tumours in rats in general. (Other kinds of tumours are, however, available.) So yes, male rats probably are less likely to develop tumours overall than female rats. Male rats are more prone to heart and kidney disease, however, so it's six of one and half a dozen of the other really.

Female rats are actually longer lived than males on average, and spaying a female rat significantly decreases the chance of mammary and pituitary tumours. Unless I'm much mistaken, a spayed female rat should actually have the longest life expectancy for an adult rat (spayed/neutered vs entire, and male vs female).

Whatever you choose, when you do introduce your new rats, try the carrier method: http://www.fancyratsforum.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=52
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