Neutered male still aggressive

Topics on behaviour, taming, companionship, introductions, and training
Post Reply
cmae
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu May 28, 2020 10:56 pm

Neutered male still aggressive

Post by cmae » Thu May 28, 2020 11:11 pm

Any advice for aggression in a neutered buck? It is hardly ever a rat ball situation but very harsh grooming and behaviours like the one I've quoted from the isamu website:

​occasionally the aggressor may not be satisfied by the victim giving up and will harass them constantly not allowing the victim to rest. This is extreme aggressive behaviour and should be intervened in, with possibly thoughts to neutering the offending rat if it continues. This shouldn’t be mistaken with the victim not giving in and allowing the aggressor to prove their dominance, in this case the focus should be on the victim rather than the aggressor

- there are other behaviours he exhibits (for example before he finds somewhere to clamp down on his head shakes erratically and my partner reckons he is quite calculated when he bites down). It is slightly more geared towards his littermate who is the timid one I mention below but he has his fair share of scuffles with my other boys. Everyone is neutered.

Even our alpha rat is starting to get weary/slightly scared of him and one of our other rats (he is quite a nervous fella to begin with) is terrified
We have tried reintroducing and some separation but am willing to try it again if that's what advice is given.

He wasn't quite as bad before he had a tail amputation 6-8 weeks ago (beginning of lockdown), post surgery he obsessively chewed his foot and had to be intensely looked after by the vet overnight. We always had wondering whether or not he was ok mentally - the issues were still there just not as prevalent. Vet suggested it was like a 'pins and needles' situation with the foot but they'd never seen anything like it. Other than that recovery went well. Isolated throughout.
Before I knew better, originated from PAH. Have learned my lesson and am on a waiting list for a breeder for future rats but this is why I can't seek advice from a breeder.

I've tried to include everything I can think of that could be relevant - it has been suggested he could be homed with girls but how do I go about this if so? Rehome to another girl group? I could get does from the breeder but I am anxious about introducing them to him.

Thank you. I know there's a lot here.

cmae
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu May 28, 2020 10:56 pm

Re: Neutered male still aggressive

Post by cmae » Thu May 28, 2020 11:14 pm

Aggressor and littermate: 13 months
Older boys(including alpha): 19 months
Aggressor has been neutered for estimated 8 months

cosmo
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu May 21, 2020 6:04 pm

Re: Neutered male still aggressive

Post by cosmo » Sat May 30, 2020 3:34 pm

i dont have rats yet but thought i would answer if only to give you a nudge, maybe these can help
http://ratguide.com/health/reference/resources.php

is it possible the head shake before clamping down could be a seizure?

not sure why your can't ask a breeder about it i am sure they are willing to help even if you have your boys from a petshop and not them at the time

User avatar
[cub]
Posts: 875
Joined: Mon Sep 05, 2011 2:04 pm

Re: Neutered male still aggressive

Post by [cub] » Sat May 30, 2020 4:11 pm

You'd normally expect to see all the changes from lowered hormones by 3 months after neutering, so after 8 months, any behavioural issues that remain are not going to be due to testosterone.

The head shaking makes me think that there could be something else going on, possibly something neurological. If you can get a video of it (maybe post it on Youtube or similar) that might be helpful.

What other odd behaviours does he exhibit? And how long did the post-surgical foot chewing last? Rats can be a bit off their face on drugs for the first day after surgery (depending on what anaesthesia and other medications were used), and that can particularly lead to them chewing obsessively on their stitches, but I've never heard of them chewing another body part before, and they usually stop after a day or so.

You could rehome him to live with does if you wanted to try that but didn't want to have a second group yourself, but at this stage I'm not convinced that housing with does would fix the problem; I think there's something else going on.
Poo-shoveller to: Calyn (NLA32), Zephyr Nyahir, Zephyr Zymandis, Zephyr Blasto.
Fondly remembering: Zephyr Mick Jagger (Edgeworth), Din (NLA28), Zephyr Donovan (Phoenix), Xeltan, Lita (NLA32), Lia (NLA28), Zephyr Delanynder (NLA28), Falere (NLA36), Mirala (NLA36), Zephyr Opold, and Rila.

Post Reply

Return to “Behaviour”